The Saskatchewan Arts Alliance has a great collection of data related to the impact of the arts on education, health, the economy, community, and so much more. On this page you will find numbers and statistics collected and published by a variety of sources that show through data what the Saskatchewan Arts Alliance has been saying since 1984. 

Culture GDP in Saskatchewan was $914.9 million in 2016, representing 1.3% of the province’s economy.1

The number of cultural jobs in Saskatchewan: "Culture jobs increased 2.2% to 12,850 in 2016. Overall, total jobs in Saskatchewan decreased 1.1%." 2

Artists play an important, valuable role in Saskatchewan society and deserve fair compensation for their work. Public access to art and artists – through distribution, exhibition, education and training – benefits Saskatchewan and all its citizens. 

Arts organizations and associations are integral to connecting artists and their work with the public through creation, dissemination and exhibition of artistic works, leadership and education.

The Saskatchewan Government’s $3.4M investment in arts organizations - through the Arts Board - triggers another $3.3M in federal investment and generates expenditures almost 9 times the original investment (Source: CADAC Data).


1) Statistics Canada, Provincial and Territorial Culture Indicators, 2016, The Daily, Released at 8:30 a.m. Eastern time in The Daily, Tuesday, February 27, 2018.

2) Phoenix Strategic Perspectives, The Arts and Heritage in Canada – Access and Availability 2012.

Arts Involvement Drives Innovation:

Arts Education develops five skills that underpin innovative behavior and are linked to the innovation process in youth. These skills match what employers say they most need in their new recruits, but which they too often find missing. 

  • Creativity - imagination, connecting ideas, tackling and solving problems, curiosity;
  • Self-efficacy - self-belief, self-assurance, self-awareness, feelings of empowerment, social confidence;
  • Energy - drive, enthusiasm, motivation, hard work, persistence and commitment;
  • Risk-propensity - a combination of risk tolerance and the ability to take calculated risks; and 
  • Leadership - vision and the ability to mobilize commitment. 1

Turning STEM into STEAM: "the arts are essential to innovative thinking and behavior and can be applied in all K-12 schools through policy change, inquiry-based curriculum including arts education curriculum, and open dialogue among science, math, technology and arts education teachers" - Dianne Warren's Future Innovators: Developing Creativity Through K-12 Arts Education in Saskatchewan Schools.2

Providing STEM professionals with significant arts exposure (throughout their lifetimes), may be essential to their creative capital potential.


1) C. Brooke Dobni, PhD, Achieving Growth through Innovation: The Role of Arts Education in Supporting Economic Sustainability, May 2014.

2) Warren, Dianne. Future Innovators: Developing Creativity Through K-12 Arts Education in Saskatchewan Schools. Saskatchewan Arts Alliance, August 15, 2016. p6.

(3)LaMore, Rex, Robert Root-Bernstein, Michele Root-Bernstein, John H. Schweitzer, James L. Lawton, Eileen Roraback, Amber Peruski, Megan VanDyke and Laleah Fernandez, “Arts and Crafts: Critical to Economic Innovation” Economic Development Quarterly 2013 27: 221 originally published online 28 April 2013. DOI: 10.1177/0891242413486186.

The Arts make a difference in all our lives:

  • improve quality of life
  • create stronger communities
  • help people feel a sense of belonging and involvement
  • create a forum for intercultural understanding and friendship ​1

Canadians support the arts. In a 2015 study for Business for the Arts:

Over 80% said the following are good reasons for supporting the arts:

  • The arts enhance creativity and innovation
  • Arts education can assist children at risk in channeling their energies in a more productive direction
  • Arts education assists in the emotional and intellectual development of children
  • The arts help people understand other cultures
  • The arts can contribute to personal well being 2

Over 70% agreed that good reasons for supporting the arts also included:

  • Communities with an active arts scene tend to be vibrant places to live and work
  • Arts activities help reduce youth alienation and crime
  • The arts can deepen emotional experience
  • Participation in the arts can lead to enhanced self awareness
  • The arts promote understanding and tolerance
  • The arts contribute to deepening personal awareness
  • The arts have the potential to contribute to the economic wellbeing of the community 3

Arts Access: Good for People and Communities

Canadians believe that the performing arts benefit their communities, whether or not they attend (according to a 2012 EKOS/CAPACOA survey). In fact, the less likely Canadians are to attend, the more they believe that the performing arts benefit their communities rather than only individuals attending.4


(1) Canada Council, Impact of the Arts on Canadian Life.

(2) Environics Research Group, Arts and Heritage Access and Availability Survey 2016-2017, Department of Canadian Heritage and Canada Council for the Arts, POR number: 051-16. 2017.

(3) Strategic Counsel, Building the Case for Business Support of the Arts: A Study Commissioned by Business for the Arts, Feb. 2015.

(4) Value of Presenting - Survey of the General Public, 2012 (EKOS Research Associates/CAPACOA).

Canadians value the arts. In a 2015 Business for the Arts survey, Canadian parents agreed:

  • Engaging in the arts gives children more confidence (81%)
  • The arts help children develop a better understanding of themselves and others (75%)

The same study surveyed large Canadian businesses. 83% agreed that "Arts education has a positive effect on the lives of children and youth" and is an important reason for supporting the arts. 1

Benefits of high-quality arts education programs:

  • Student achievement across academic areas (typically as represented by reading and mathematics performance on high stakes tests).
  • Student motivation and engagement: improved attendance, persistence, focused attention, heightened educational aspirations, and intellectual risk taking.
  • Good mind-habits: problem solving, critical and creative thinking, dealing with ambiguity and complexity, integration of multiple skill sets, and working with others; and
  • Social competencies: collaboration and team work skills, social tolerance, and self-confidence 2

Arts Education also Drives Innovation, as Dianne Warren's report for the SAA explains:

  • “Arts Education in schools is a means of developing the collection of skills comprising creativity. They are a necessary part of a contemporary education for our students, no matter what they plan to do after high school. The students in school today are the 21st century learners we’ve talked about for so long, and it behooves us to ensure that they acquire – through studies in the STEM subjects and the arts, through curriculum and partnerships with the professional arts community – the skills and abilities that will make them the future innovators of Saskatchewan” 3

Arts Education develops five skills that underpin innovative behavior and are linked to the innovation process in youth. These skills match what employers say they most need in their new recruits, but which they too often find missing.

  • Creativity
  • Self-efficacy
  • Energy
  • Risk-propensity
  • Leadership 4

(1) Strategic Counsel, Building the Case for Business Support of the Arts: A Study Commissioned by Business for the Arts, Feb 2015.

(2) President's Committee on the Arts and the HumanitiesReinvesting in Arts Education: Winning America’s Future through Creative Schools, Washington, DC, May 2011.

(3) Warren, Dianne. Future Innovators: Developing Creativity Through K-12 Arts Education in Saskatchewan Schools. Saskatchewan Arts Alliance, August 15, 2016. p12.

(4) C. Brooke Dobni, PhD, Achieving Growth through Innovation: The Role of Arts Education in Supporting Economic Sustainability, May 2014.